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Interview: Katarina Ševic and Gergely László Print E-mail
Interviews
Written by Frantisek Zachoval   
Wednesday, 12 March 2014 00:00

I met with artists Katarina Ševic and Gergely László at the Ethnological Museum in Berlin to talk about their project House Museum (2006), developed after being able to return to Ševic's summer cottage in Žuljana, a small village on the Pelješac Peninsula (Croatia) after the civil war in ex-Yugoslavia (1991-2001). The ethnic conflicts prohibited Ševic, a Serbian citizen, and her family to enter Croatian territory and, therefore, inhabit the house. Thirteen years later, the artist returned and, working collectively with Gergely László, cleaned and repaired the house, left ravaged by war and occupied in her family's absence. The artists gathered more than 100 objects, employing archeological principles to uncover the past of the house and archive the found objects discovered. The House Museum has been exhibited in the group exhibitions Lost in Transition, CAME, Tallinn (2011); Bunker Design at the Moscow Biennial, Hungarian Cultural Centre, Moscow (2007); and at the Remont Gallery, Belgrade (2007) and the Hungarian University of Fine Arts, Budapest (2006).

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On Survivors, Translation and Their Next: A Conversation Between Walid Sadek and Nadia Bou Ali Print E-mail
Interviews
Written by Nadia Bou Ali (Beirut)   
Monday, 15 June 2015 08:37

Much like Sadek's other interventions since the proclaimed end of the Lebanese "civil war," his allegorical sensibility throughout this interview inhabits the unnerving proximity of transitoriness and eternity. One of the fundamental questions raised by Sadek is the specific nature of an openness to a world struck by the historical violence and structural dislocations of capitalist modernity. This is because sectarianism – another of Sadek's key themes – is both a symptom of capitalist relations and something from which the figure of the survivor emerges; sectarianism is imbued with guilt-saturated relations in the face of guiltless commodity relations that have overtaken Lebanese society along with others around the globe.

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A Way to Follow: Interview with Piotr Piotrowski Print E-mail
Interviews
Written by Richard Kosinsky, Jan Elantkowski, Barbara Dudás (Lublin)   
Thursday, 29 January 2015 00:00

It is with great sadness and a sense of enormous loss that we learnt of the recent death of Piotr Piotrowski. Piotrowski was a professor in the Art History Department of Adam Mickiewicz University, Poznań, and a research fellow at the Graduate School for East and South-East European Studies at the universities of Munich and Regensburg. He is the author of several books, including: Meanings of Modernism (2009, 2011), In the Shadow of Yalta (2009), Art after Politics (2007), Critical Museum (2011), and Art and Democracy in Post-Communist Europe (2012). Between 2009 and 2010, he was the director of the National Museum in Warsaw, and in 2010 he was the recipient of the Igor Zabel Award for Culture and Theory. Piotrowski was on the Advisory Board of ARTMargins Print Journal and was an early supporter of this publication. The following interview was occassioned by the recent international conference Piotrowski organized on global art history, East European Art Seen from Global Perspectives: Past and Present, that took place in Lublin, Poland, October 24-27, 2014.(For further information about the program of the conference, the lectures and the speakers, visit: http://www.konferencja.labirynt.com/en.)

- The Editors

Richard Kosinsky: When defining a specific geographic location do you think that this carries the danger of fragmentation and/or generalization?

Piotr Piotrowski: Usually, conferences present a specific view of a certain research area; this leads to fragmentation because they cannot deal with everything. It is really hard to write or to discuss this sort of synthesis.

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New In ARTMargins Print

ARTMargins Print has released its new issue, 4.2. (June 2015)!

ArticlesBill Roberts (Warwick/UK) on postmodernism's contemporaneity. Sven Spieker (Los Angeles/Berlin) considers the figure of the Vertreter in the work of Martin Kippenberger.

Essay: Walid Sadek (Beirut): When Next We Meet: On the Figure of the Nonposthumous Survivor

 Online supplement: A Conversation with Walid Sadek. FREE ACCESS.

In the Document section, we present, for the first time an early conversation between Hsieh Tehching, Ai Weiwei, and Xu Bing (introduction and translation, Lee Ambrozy). FREE ACCESS.

Artist ProjectRobert Zhao Renhui (Singapore): As We Walk on Water. FREE ACCESS.

Review Article: Christopher T. Green (New York City), Artists, of the Great Lakes? Problematizing the Exhibition of Place in Native American Art."
 

Click here for more information at the MIT Press ARTMargins site.

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Two independent outlets, in separate media, of one and the same publication.

LOGO: ARTMargins Print

PRINT: Contemporary art in a global context

Published triquarterly by the MIT Press, ARTMargins provides a forum for the discussion of postmodernism and post-colonialism, and their critiques; art and politics in transitional countries and regions; post-socialism and neo-liberalism; and the problem of global art and global art history.

LOGO: ARTMargins Online

ONLINE: Central and Eastern Europe

Founded in 1999, ARTMargins Online publishes articles, interviews, essays, and reviews devoted to contemporary art. Unlike ARTMargins (print), ARTMargins Online has traditionally had a regional focus, central and Eastern Europe.

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