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Interview: Katarina Ševic and Gergely László Print E-mail
Written by Frantisek Zachoval   
Wednesday, 12 March 2014 00:00

I met with artists Katarina Ševic and Gergely László at the Ethnological Museum in Berlin to talk about their project House Museum (2006), developed after being able to return to Ševic's summer cottage in Žuljana, a small village on the Pelješac Peninsula (Croatia) after the civil war in ex-Yugoslavia (1991-2001). The ethnic conflicts prohibited Ševic, a Serbian citizen, and her family to enter Croatian territory and, therefore, inhabit the house. Thirteen years later, the artist returned and, working collectively with Gergely László, cleaned and repaired the house, left ravaged by war and occupied in her family's absence. The artists gathered more than 100 objects, employing archeological principles to uncover the past of the house and archive the found objects discovered. The House Museum has been exhibited in the group exhibitions Lost in Transition, CAME, Tallinn (2011); Bunker Design at the Moscow Biennial, Hungarian Cultural Centre, Moscow (2007); and at the Remont Gallery, Belgrade (2007) and the Hungarian University of Fine Arts, Budapest (2006).

Moscow Conceptualism in the 1980s: Interview with Sabine Hänsgen (Zurich) Print E-mail
Written by Olga Martin (Zürich)   
Thursday, 27 August 2015 16:22

Olga Martin: In 1984, when nobody could imagine the end of the Soviet Union, you clandestinely made the video documentation Moscow Moscow about Russian underground art and literature, and smuggled it to the West. This was probably very exciting for you, but didn't you take a great personal risk?

Sabine Hänsgen: Certainly, from the Soviet point of view this was a forbidden recording. I could have been expelled from USSR and denied re-entry. Already at the beginning of the 1980s, when I was studying in Moscow for the first time, I felt that the artistic underground was threatened by censorship and repression. Therefore I thought it would be important to document the life of this milieu. I had gotten to know many artists from the conceptualist circle, and when I came back to Moscow for my second stay in 1984, I decided to start a video documentation about artistic communication outside of the official institutions of Soviet culture. From my point of view, video is an excellent medium for archiving situations that are usually excluded from official memory.

On Survivors, Translation and Their Next: A Conversation Between Walid Sadek and Nadia Bou Ali Print E-mail
Written by Nadia Bou Ali (Beirut)   
Monday, 15 June 2015 08:37

Much like Sadek's other interventions since the proclaimed end of the Lebanese "civil war," his allegorical sensibility throughout this interview inhabits the unnerving proximity of transitoriness and eternity. One of the fundamental questions raised by Sadek is the specific nature of an openness to a world struck by the historical violence and structural dislocations of capitalist modernity. This is because sectarianism – another of Sadek's key themes – is both a symptom of capitalist relations and something from which the figure of the survivor emerges; sectarianism is imbued with guilt-saturated relations in the face of guiltless commodity relations that have overtaken Lebanese society along with others around the globe.


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New In ARTMargins Print

ARTMargins Print has released its new issue, 4.2. (June 2015)!

ArticlesBill Roberts (Warwick/UK) on postmodernism's contemporaneity. Sven Spieker (Los Angeles/Berlin) considers the figure of the Vertreter in the work of Martin Kippenberger.

Essay: Walid Sadek (Beirut): When Next We Meet: On the Figure of the Nonposthumous Survivor

 Online supplement: A Conversation with Walid Sadek. FREE ACCESS.

In the Document section, we present, for the first time an early conversation between Hsieh Tehching, Ai Weiwei, and Xu Bing (introduction and translation, Lee Ambrozy). FREE ACCESS.

Artist ProjectRobert Zhao Renhui (Singapore): As We Walk on Water. FREE ACCESS.

Review Article: Christopher T. Green (New York City), Artists, of the Great Lakes? Problematizing the Exhibition of Place in Native American Art."

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Published triquarterly by the MIT Press, ARTMargins provides a forum for the discussion of postmodernism and post-colonialism, and their critiques; art and politics in transitional countries and regions; post-socialism and neo-liberalism; and the problem of global art and global art history.

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Founded in 1999, ARTMargins Online publishes articles, interviews, essays, and reviews devoted to contemporary art. Unlike ARTMargins (print), ARTMargins Online has traditionally had a regional focus, central and Eastern Europe.