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Interview: Katarina Ševic and Gergely László Print E-mail
Interviews
Written by Frantisek Zachoval   
Wednesday, 12 March 2014 00:00

I met with artists Katarina Ševic and Gergely László at the Ethnological Museum in Berlin to talk about their project House Museum (2006), developed after being able to return to Ševic's summer cottage in Žuljana, a small village on the Pelješac Peninsula (Croatia) after the civil war in ex-Yugoslavia (1991-2001). The ethnic conflicts prohibited Ševic, a Serbian citizen, and her family to enter Croatian territory and, therefore, inhabit the house. Thirteen years later, the artist returned and, working collectively with Gergely László, cleaned and repaired the house, left ravaged by war and occupied in her family's absence. The artists gathered more than 100 objects, employing archeological principles to uncover the past of the house and archive the found objects discovered. The House Museum has been exhibited in the group exhibitions Lost in Transition, CAME, Tallinn (2011); Bunker Design at the Moscow Biennial, Hungarian Cultural Centre, Moscow (2007); and at the Remont Gallery, Belgrade (2007) and the Hungarian University of Fine Arts, Budapest (2006).

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Interview with Alexei Yurchak Print E-mail
Interviews
Written by Andres Kurg (Tallinn)   
Thursday, 05 June 2014 00:00

Alexei Yurchak is Associate Professor in the Department of Anthropology and core faculty member in the Department of Performance Studies at the University of California, Berkeley. In 2006, Yurchak published a groundbreaking study of the late-Soviet period, Everything Was Forever, Until It Was No More: The Last Soviet Generation (Princeton University Press), which earned him widespread recognition. Analyzing a variety of major shifts in political representation and meaning after the middle 1950s, and ensuing changes in late Soviet everyday practices—from Soviet ideological language to the fascination with Western rock music, the spread of popular jokes and anecdotes, among others—the book refutes a widespread take on this period as being structured by binary oppositions, such as public versus private; the people versus the state; the official versus the unofficial sphere, or the Soviet versus the anti-Soviet. Drawing on this extensive ethnographic study of the late-Soviet period, Yurchak expands in this interview on why the notions of the "dissident" or "nonconformist" artist are inadequate for characterizing informal artistic groups in the late-Soviet period.

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Politics, the Environment and Art Across a Changing Political Landscape: Interview with Maja and Reuben Fowkes Print E-mail
Interviews
Written by Janeil Engelstad   
Sunday, 13 July 2014 20:36

Roșia Montană protest poster after a drawing by Dan Perjovschi, 2013. Image courtesy of Dan Perjovschi.Maja and Reuben Fowkes's essay, "Green Critique in a Red Environment: East European Art and Ecology under Socialism" can be found in ARTMargins print journal (#3.2. 2014) as part of this online/offline project. In the following interview, they reflect upon contemporary artists that are addressing environmental and sustainability concerns, as well as larger issues connected to these themes.

Janeil Engelstad: Taking a broad look at Central European artists working today in ecology and with sustainability, do you sense that there is a collective art/environmental scene? And if so, do you see this work as strengthening the larger Environmental Movement?

Maja and Reuben Fowkes: It is certainly possible to identify various trends and flows within contemporary Central European art that are connected to the spread of ecological thinking, although, in our opinion, without coalescing into a movement. Environmental activism is one pole around which artists have come together, but again this tends to be related to specific issues or campaigns. 

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New In ARTMargins Print

ARTMargins Print has released its new issue, 3.2. (June 2014)!

ArticlesJoan Kee (Ann Arbor) considers the problem of scale in contemporary art practice. Carla Macchiavello (Bogotá) discusses the problem of influence in Latin American art during the 1970s and 1980s. Ruben and Maja Fowkes (Budapest) examine East European artists' approaches to the natural environment during the 1970s and beyond.

In the Document section, we present two pre-revolution Iranian manifestos of modern art (introduction/translation: Bavand Behpoor).

Artist ProjectShady El Noshokaty (Cairo), Rat Diaries, a series of drawings that attempts to map the intensity of everyday life in Egypt intertwined with intuitive visual and verbal comments on art practice.

Review Article: Monica Amor (Baltimore) discusses the exhibition Cold America: Geometric Abstraction in Latin America (1934-1973) and Alejandro Crispiani's book Objetos para transformar el mundo: Trayectorias del arte concreto-invención, Argentina y Chile, 1940-1970 [Objects to Transform the World: Trajectories of Concrete-Invention Art, Argentina and Chile, 1940-1970]. 

Click here for more information at the MIT Press ARTMargins site.

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Two independent outlets, in separate media, of one and the same publication.

LOGO: ARTMargins Print

ARTMARGINS (print journal)

ARTMargins publishes scholarly articles and essays about contemporary art, politics, media, architecture, and critical theory. ARTMargins studies art practices and visual culture in the emerging global margins, from North Africa and the Middle East to the Americas, Eastern and Western Europe, Asia and Australasia.

LOGO: ARTMargins Online

ARTMargins ONLINE

Founded in 1999, ARTMargins Online publishes material devoted to contemporary art, with a special focus on East-Central Europe.