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Report on the Construction of a Spaceship Module and Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors at The New Museum, New York Print E-mail
Exhibition Reviews
Written by Ksenia Nouril (New York)   
Tuesday, 15 April 2014 00:00

Report on the Construction of a Spaceship Module, 2014. Exhibition View: New Museum, New York. Image courtesy of the New Museum. Photo by Jesse Untracht-Oakner.Two exhibitions of Central and Eastern European art were recently on view at the New Museum in New York. The first, Report on the Construction of a Spaceship Module, was part of the Museum as Hub series, a New Museum initiative supporting exhibitions, residencies, and public programs focused on promoting international contemporary art. It was guest curated for the New Museum by a multinational team from tranzit.org, including Vít Havránek, Dóra Hegyi, and Georg Schöllhammer, the three directors of the tranzit organizations in Prague, Budapest, and Vienna, respectively.(There is no catalogue for this exhibition; however, a newspaper with new and reprinted texts as well as an extensive bibliography was published. A copy of it can be found here: http://235bowery.s3.amazonaws.com/exhibitionlinks/103/Tranzit_FINAL_small.pdf) The second, Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors, was the largest survey of the Polish artist's work to date and his first solo exhibition in the United States. Massimiliano Gioni, Associate Director and Director of Exhibitions, and Gary Carrion-Murayari, Curator, organized the exhibition, which was accompanied by a fully illustrated catalogue with new essays and an interview.(Massimiliano Gioni and Gary Carrion-Murayari, eds., Paweł Althamer: The Neighbors (New York: Skira Rizzoli Publications, Inc., 2014).) Together, these exhibitions filled four out of the five floors in the museum, which in 2011 presented Ostalgia, a group exhibition of Soviet and post-Soviet art from the former Eastern Bloc that was as productive as it was problematic. These recent exhibitions attest to the New Museum's continued interest in the region.

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The 54th October Salon in Belgrade Print E-mail
Exhibition Reviews
Written by Biljana Purić (Belgrade)   
Tuesday, 25 March 2014 00:00

Tejal Shah, “Between the Waves,” video installation, 2012. Image courtesy of the October Salon.The 54th installment of the October Salon in Belgrade focused on feminist and queer interventions in the dominant narratives of knowledge production within patriarchal post-socialist and neoliberal realities. It boldly introduced a variety of artistic expressions within the "Living Archive" framework proposed by the Red Min(e)d curatorial team (Danijela Dugandžić Živanović, Katja Kobolt, Dunja Kukovec and Jelena Petrović). The concept of "Living Archive" derives from theoretical elaborations of a new, feminist archive in lieu of the standard, conventional systems of archivization and of the traditional archive as a site for normative meaning production. The Living Archive, as described by Biljana Kašić "is a radical interruption in a main system of meanings and structure of archiving through its disruptive modes of (re)inscribing, coding and decoding...[it is] an open space that means and creates both dislocation and new location, visibility and presence of the invisible, possibility and freedom of experimentation, thereby enabling politicization of space and time."(Biljana Kašić, "Thinking Living Archive; 'Archiving' the Thoughts or Feminism or?" (Living Archive Notebooks, 2012), 9,12.)

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Cinema by Other Means at MoCA, Belgrade Print E-mail
Exhibition Reviews
Written by Greg de Cuir, Jr. (Belgrade)   
Thursday, 10 October 2013 00:00

Installation view of Cinema by Other Means at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Belgrade. Photo by Saša Reljić. Courtesy of the Museum of Contemporary Art, Belgrade.The Museum of Contemporary Art in Belgrade recently presented the exhibition Cinema by Other Means at the Čolaković Gallery, their off-site exhibition space. The gallery is named after Rodoljub Čolaković, a high-ranking party functionary in the Socialist Federal Republic of Yugoslavia and a man of letters. Čolaković wrote the book House of Lament in 1941 under the pen name Rudi R. Bosamac. This book was banned by the royalist authorities in the Kingdom of Yugoslavia for its socially critical views and exposé on the situation of political prisoners. Čolaković himself spent more than a decade in prison for his involvement with an extreme left-wing group that engineered the assassination of the Yugoslav interior minister in 1921. 

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New In ARTMargins Print

ARTMargins Print has released its new issue, 3.2. (June 2014)!

ArticlesJoan Kee (Ann Arbor) considers the problem of scale in contemporary art practice. Carla Macchiavello (Bogotá) discusses the problem of influence in Latin American art during the 1970s and 1980s. Ruben and Maja Fowkes (Budapest) examine East European artists' approaches to the natural environment during the 1970s and beyond.

In the Document section, we present two pre-revolution Iranian manifestos of modern art (introduction/translation: Bavand Behpoor).

Artist ProjectShady El Noshokaty (Cairo), Rat Diaries, a series of drawings that attempts to map the intensity of everyday life in Egypt intertwined with intuitive visual and verbal comments on art practice.

Review Article: Monica Amor (Baltimore) discusses the exhibition Cold America: Geometric Abstraction in Latin America (1934-1973) and Alejandro Crispiani's book Objetos para transformar el mundo: Trayectorias del arte concreto-invención, Argentina y Chile, 1940-1970 [Objects to Transform the World: Trajectories of Concrete-Invention Art, Argentina and Chile, 1940-1970]. 

Click here for more information at the MIT Press ARTMargins site.

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ARTMargins publishes scholarly articles and essays about contemporary art, politics, media, architecture, and critical theory. ARTMargins studies art practices and visual culture in the emerging global margins, from North Africa and the Middle East to the Americas, Eastern and Western Europe, Asia and Australasia.

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