No more suffering as you can now Buy Zovirax

ARTMargins Home Books Book Reviews
Zsófia Bán and Hedvig Turai, eds., “Exposed Memories: Family Pictures in Private and Collective Memory” (Book Review) Print E-mail
Book Reviews
Written by Katherine Hill Reischl (Princeton)   
Wednesday, 17 September 2014 00:00

Roland Barthes's first reflections in Camera Lucida are propelled by the pleasure of viewing the photographic image. At the end of his survey of a wide photographic landscape, Barthes comes to realize his failing as an "imperfect mediator" whose investigation of photography led only to a clearer understanding of his own desire, and not "the nature (the eidos) of Photography" (Barthes, 60). Perhaps paradoxically, Barthes's turn to the "universal" in the latter half of Camera Lucida, to the ontology of the photograph, is founded on a more personal and intimate journey: the narrative exploration of the precious family photograph of his departed mother.

Read more...
 
György Galántai and Júlia Klaniczay, eds., “Artpool: The Experimental Art Archive of East-Central Europe” (Book Review) Print E-mail
Book Reviews
Written by Éva Forgács (Los Angeles)   
Monday, 02 June 2014 00:00

Artpool's first rubber stamp, 1979. Image courtesy of Artpool Art Research Center.The importance of this long overdue autobiographical volume by Artpool, the Budapest "Experimental Art Archive of East-Central Europe" is hard to overestimate. Archivists György Galántai and Júlia Klaniczay, who double as the book's authors and editors, account for both a Hungarian and widely international presence in and around Artpool's orbit. Art historian Kristine Stiles strikes a personal and professional chord in her pithy and highly appreciative Introduction, rightly calling the book "a milestone in the history of art for its documentation of a remarkable period," and points out that Artpool is both an artwork and an archive (p. 8).

Read more...
 
Djurdja Bartlett, “Fashion East: The Spectre that Haunted Socialism” Print E-mail
Book Reviews
Written by Malynne Sternstein (Chicago)   
Tuesday, 28 May 2013 00:00

Impressive in its scope, beautifully illustrated, and admirable for its depth and breadth of archival research, Djurdja Bartlett's sumptuous book Fashion East: The Spectre that Haunted Socialism does not in any way disappoint the reader looking for a survey of sartorial history in the Soviet Communist bloc. Bartlett does a magisterial job in traversing the cultural space of Soviet fashion from the 1920s "avant-garde" to the late Soviet era.

Read more...
 

Search ARTMargins

AddThis Social Bookmark Button

New In ARTMargins Print

ARTMargins Print has released its new issue, 4.1. (February 2015)!

ArticlesLuis Castañeda (Syracuse) on conflicting racial, archaeological and art historical interpretations of Olmec art produced in the United States in the early 1960s. Chelsea Foxwell (Chicago) reconsiders the uses of nihonga in contemporary Japanese art.

In the Document section, we present a previously untranslated section from S.R. Choucair's seminal text "How the Arab Understood Visual Art," a quasi-manifesto for modernist art in the Arab world (introduction and translation, Kirsten Scheid). FREE ACCESS.

Artist ProjectMarwa Arsanios (Beirut): Olga's Notes: This Whole New World. FREE ACCESS.

Review Articles: Ezra Akcan (Ithaca/NY), "Is a Global History of Architecture Displayable? A Historiographical Perspective on the 14th Venice Architecture Biennale and Louvre Abu Dhabi." 

Click here for more information at the MIT Press ARTMargins site.

Read more
 

Newsletter Signup


Two independent outlets, in separate media, of one and the same publication.

LOGO: ARTMargins Print

PRINT: Contemporary art in a global context

Published triquarterly by the MIT Press, ARTMargins provides a forum for the discussion of postmodernism and post-colonialism, and their critiques; art and politics in transitional countries and regions; post-socialism and neo-liberalism; and the problem of global art and global art history.

LOGO: ARTMargins Online

ONLINE: Central and Eastern Europe

Founded in 1999, ARTMargins Online publishes articles, interviews, essays, and reviews devoted to contemporary art. Unlike ARTMargins (print), ARTMargins Online has traditionally had a regional focus, central and Eastern Europe.